We know that remaining physically active as possible, no matter any physical limitations, is crucial to our total well being. There's a plethora of compelling evidence demonstrating that staying physically fit prevents or delays many chronic diseases, while at the same time, improving mood and reducing depression and cognitive decline.

Susan Holtzman

Susan O. Holtzman earned Master’s Degree in Gerontology and Aging Services after a long career in healthcare and medical education.  Her experience in caring for her mother as she aged, and assisting friends and family in finding care solutions led her to become involved in gerontology and aging issues on an individual as well as public policy level.  Susan will be blogging on issues relating to Aging and Caregiving. 


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Some type of daily exercise routine is so important for our physical as well as emotional well-being.  When creating a care-plan I always encourage my clients to be sure to plan for access to physical activity during the day.  The issues to be sure to address in an exercise routine include flexibility and strength building.  Focusing on these will help to keep you or your loved one safer from falls, help to prevent osteoporosis, and support agility, which diminishes as we age.  If you or your loved one are not interested in going to the gym to get your daily exercise, or

Susan Holtzman

Susan O. Holtzman earned Master’s Degree in Gerontology and Aging Services after a long career in healthcare and medical education.  Her experience in caring for her mother as she aged, and assisting friends and family in finding care solutions led her to become involved in gerontology and aging issues on an individual as well as public policy level.  Susan will be blogging on issues relating to Aging and Caregiving. 


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Tai Chi is a mind body practice that originated in ancient China and has been practiced for thousands of years. It began as a martial art and as it developed it became a method of enhancing physical and mental health.

Sibyl

Sibyl Adams, Seniority Matters’ featured fitness blogger, has spent three decades in the health and fitness field. She began competing in local body building events in 1980, and by 1983, she was second in her weight class in the International Arm Wresting Championships in San Jose, Costa Rica. Sibyl remained active in the body-building scene for more than a decade, while also teaching aerobics and running races. She retired from body building in 1990, but continued running competitively until 2004, when she suffered an ankle injury.

Today, Sibyl works full-time as a personal fitness trainer and is president of her own company, A Personal Touch Fitness. She is a certified Reiki master, a National Council on Strength and Fitness (NCSF) Certified Trainer, and is currently pursuing a certification in yoga. She enjoys swimming, power-walking and playing with her grandchildren.


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Staying limber is so important.....and so easy! These exercises can be done before, after or even replace a workout if you're short on time.

I. Start with the head and neck

  1. Do ten slow head circles in each direction(if you become dizzy, stop).
  2. Next, turn your head from right to left 10 to 15 times.

II. Shoulders

Sibyl

Sibyl Adams, Seniority Matters’ featured fitness blogger, has spent three decades in the health and fitness field. She began competing in local body building events in 1980, and by 1983, she was second in her weight class in the International Arm Wresting Championships in San Jose, Costa Rica. Sibyl remained active in the body-building scene for more than a decade, while also teaching aerobics and running races. She retired from body building in 1990, but continued running competitively until 2004, when she suffered an ankle injury.

Today, Sibyl works full-time as a personal fitness trainer and is president of her own company, A Personal Touch Fitness. She is a certified Reiki master, a National Council on Strength and Fitness (NCSF) Certified Trainer, and is currently pursuing a certification in yoga. She enjoys swimming, power-walking and playing with her grandchildren.


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According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), 1 in every 3 adults, 65 and older falls every year.  Why Do Older People Fall? Here are five reasons and remedies.

1. Our backs round and our heads tilt forward, changing our center of gravity.

Lillian Koziol

Lillian Koziol, E-R.Y.T. is a dedicated Yoga teacher and creator of "Y.E.S.", Yoga Empowering Seniors" program. She is also an author and avid student. She began to take yoga classes in 1998, well into "mid-life" and has been hooked ever since. In 2011, Lillian completed the Therapeutic Yoga for Seniors Professional Training at Duke University's School of Integrated Medicine. Lillian is a member of the International Association of Yoga Therapists. She is also part of the Seniority Matters Provider Directory.

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Poor posture is prevalent in older adults and can cause a myriad of problems. Poor posture causes the head to move forward and the shoulders to round, which in turn, causes neck and back pain. A once healthy gait becomes a shuffle increasing the risk of falling. People with kyphotic posture (extreme convex curvature of the upper spine) often have to use a cane or walker just to get around.

Sibyl

Sibyl Adams, Seniority Matters’ featured fitness blogger, has spent three decades in the health and fitness field. She began competing in local body building events in 1980, and by 1983, she was second in her weight class in the International Arm Wresting Championships in San Jose, Costa Rica. Sibyl remained active in the body-building scene for more than a decade, while also teaching aerobics and running races. She retired from body building in 1990, but continued running competitively until 2004, when she suffered an ankle injury.

Today, Sibyl works full-time as a personal fitness trainer and is president of her own company, A Personal Touch Fitness. She is a certified Reiki master, a National Council on Strength and Fitness (NCSF) Certified Trainer, and is currently pursuing a certification in yoga. She enjoys swimming, power-walking and playing with her grandchildren.


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Why would you want to twist yourself like a pretzel? According to the Yoga Alliance, there are many good reasons:

Stress relief: Yoga reduces the levels of cortizol__ the stress hormone

Sibyl

Sibyl Adams, Seniority Matters’ featured fitness blogger, has spent three decades in the health and fitness field. She began competing in local body building events in 1980, and by 1983, she was second in her weight class in the International Arm Wresting Championships in San Jose, Costa Rica. Sibyl remained active in the body-building scene for more than a decade, while also teaching aerobics and running races. She retired from body building in 1990, but continued running competitively until 2004, when she suffered an ankle injury.

Today, Sibyl works full-time as a personal fitness trainer and is president of her own company, A Personal Touch Fitness. She is a certified Reiki master, a National Council on Strength and Fitness (NCSF) Certified Trainer, and is currently pursuing a certification in yoga. She enjoys swimming, power-walking and playing with her grandchildren.


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September 23 is National Fall Prevention Day.  Every year over 250,000 people fall, many requiring medical attention. I am going to pay special attention to it on the 23rd, and on other days as well.

Nancy Stein

Nancy Stein is the founder of Seniority Matters and lead author of the Seniority Matters Blog. This is where you can turn to read about new service providers, enhancements to the website, and updates and commentaries on issues and events that are of interest to the South Florida senior communities. Of course, no blog is complete without feedback from readers, so don't be shy! Leave a comment and let us know what you think

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The core muscles are the large muscle groups of the back, abdomen, hips and pelvis. The core muscles stabilize us during movement and help us to handle the physical demands of daily life -- standing ,sitting, picking up children, carrying groceries or bending down to pet the dog. Peggy Brill, a physical therapist and author of “The Core Program,” says, "Both the neck and lower back are dependent on the core muscles to stabilize the spine so that all the vertebral segments align in a way that does not compress the nerves that pass through them.

Sibyl

Sibyl Adams, Seniority Matters’ featured fitness blogger, has spent three decades in the health and fitness field. She began competing in local body building events in 1980, and by 1983, she was second in her weight class in the International Arm Wresting Championships in San Jose, Costa Rica. Sibyl remained active in the body-building scene for more than a decade, while also teaching aerobics and running races. She retired from body building in 1990, but continued running competitively until 2004, when she suffered an ankle injury.

Today, Sibyl works full-time as a personal fitness trainer and is president of her own company, A Personal Touch Fitness. She is a certified Reiki master, a National Council on Strength and Fitness (NCSF) Certified Trainer, and is currently pursuing a certification in yoga. She enjoys swimming, power-walking and playing with her grandchildren.


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